Olympic Rowing – Final Update

Molly Reckford, Millicent Fenwick’s Great-Granddaughter, and Michelle Sechser made it to the Olympic finals last week for the women’s lightweight double sculls rowing. It was a very competitive race and they finished in 6 minutes 48.54 seconds. They were less than a second from receiving the bronze medal and one second from receiving the gold! So close! We are proud of them for giving it their all and representing the United States well. The times below show how competitive the Final A race was. 

Country: Minutes/Seconds/Milliseconds

1. Italy: 6.47.54

2. France: 6.47.68

3. The Netherlands: 6:48.03

4. Great Britain: 6:48:04

5. USA: 6.48.54

6. Romania: 6:49:40

Women’s Lightweight Double Sculls Rowing Results: Final A

Olympic Update

I’m happy to report that Molly Reckford, and Michelle Sechser are heading to the women’s lightweight double sculls rowing semi-finals tomorrow night, Tuesday, July 27, at 10:50 pm EDT. You can watch it live at http://www.nbcolympics.com. The top three teams will compete in the “A” final on Wednesday, July 28. You can watch their winning race from Saturday here (start at 83:03). A special thanks to Sam Reckford, Millicent Fenwick’s grandson and Molly’s Dad, for the updates. Go Molly and Michelle! Go Team USA!

Molly Reckford and Michelle Sechser at the 2021 World Rowing Final Olympic Qualifying Regatta in Switzerland

Millicent Fenwick’s Great-Granddaughter is an Olympian

Molly Reckford, Millicent Fenwick’s great grandchild, won the U.S. Olympic Rowing Trials in the women’s lightweight double sculls and won the final Olympic Qualifying Regatta in Lucerne. She is in Tokyo as part of the USA Olympic team! Her first race is tonight, Friday, July 23, at 9:20 PM EDT. Stay tuned for more information and Go Molly! Go USA!

Remembering Millicent Fenwick on her Birthday

February 25, 2021

During this past year consumed by the pandemic and the tumultuous election, aftermath, and insurrection, I’ve been thinking a lot about Millicent Fenwick who would have turned 111 today, February 25. I think in this period when politics has become so partisan, Millicent Fenwick would have been a voice of reason and led by example. What has been surprising, and rewarding, is that her memory is alive and well nearly 30 years after her death in 1992. 

How do I know this? Because over the past year I have received snail mail and emails from readers who have discovered Millicent Fenwick: Her Way. As an author, there is no greater gift than hearing from readers, especially about a book that was published 18 years ago this month. Millicent Fenwick’s biography has far outlived the typical shelf life of most books. The one regret I have is that there never was a paperback edition. I just went on to amazon and the cost of the book has skyrocketed which I guess indicates demand. 

How do I know this? Because over the past year I have received snail mail and emails from readers who have discovered Millicent Fenwick: Her Way. As an author, there is no greater gift than hearing from readers, especially about a book that was published 18 years ago this month. Millicent Fenwick’s biography has far outlived the typical shelf life of most books. The one regret I have is that there never was a paperback edition. I just went on to amazon and the cost of the book has skyrocketed which I guess indicates demand. During this past year consumed by the pandemic and the tumultuous election, aftermath, and insurrection, I’ve been thinking a lot about Millicent Fenwick who would have turned 111 today, February 25. I think in this period when politics has become so partisan, Millicent Fenwick would have been a voice of reason and led by example. What has been surprising, and rewarding, is that her memory is alive and well nearly 30 years after her death in 1992. 

Another indicator of demand was book events which have continued over the years with the most recent being in October when the Hoboken Historical Museum included Millicent Fenwick in their “NJ Women Make History!” series. 

Earlier today, Stephen Grant, a fellow biographer, sent me a FaceBook post from Joseph Esposito remembering Millicent Fenwick. What was clear from his post, and the comments, is how much Millicent Fenwick still resonates with those who knew her and those who did not. She was a principled, outspoken, dedicated and passionate public servant who in her day was dubbed the “Conscience of Congress” by Walter Cronkite. When John Lewis died, the same was said of him. I think they both are in good company. 

Not only does her memory continue to live on, but so do her legislative achievements, most notably the establishment of the U.S. Helsinki Commission, Public Law 94-304 of June 3, 1976, signed by President Gerald Ford which promoted the monitoring of human rights in accordance with the Helsinki Final Act of 1975 signed by 35 nations including the United States and the Soviet Union. Bill Canis, one of Fenwick’s former staffers sent me this link to an article published this past year commemorating Fenwick’s role in establishing the commission: https://www.csce.gov/international-impact/representative-millicent-fenwick

Another discovery I made this year is a Millicent Fenwick high school curriculum from the New Jersey Historical Commission as part of their “It Happened Here New Jersey” series. At a time when many are looking for civility and reason, I am glad to know that the next generation is learning about role models such as Millicent Fenwick. educators are leveraging the many lessons gleaned from Fenwick’s life. As former Governor Christine Todd Whitman said, “Millicent Fenwick was really ‘My Way.’ And she did it with class and style …She showed that a single mother could make it, that you could be independent and balance things, and that women could be very credible policy advocates.”

At Millicent Fenwick’s funeral her grandson, Jonathan Reckford, now CEO of Habitat for Humanity, delivered the eulogy. He said the following, “She brought elegance to the most mundane matters and showed that indeed one can fight for change without breaching decorum.” 

Doonesbury Turns 50

Thanks to everyone who emailed me this past week to let me know about the Washington Post article celebrating the 50th anniversary of Doonesbury. The article featured Garry Trudeau’s top ten most defining comic strips over the the last half century. And wouldn’t you know it, there was a Lacey Davenport comic strip included among the list. It was from 1985 and entitled “Palm Beach Card Controversy” which led to a legislative change in Florida. You can read more about it below.

Lacey Davenport featured in Garry Trudeau’s Top Ten Defining Doonesbury Comic Strips

Palm Beach, Fla., ordinance requires low-wage service employees to register with police and carry ID cards.

Trudeau: The legendary Mary McGrory told me that in all her years of writing columns, she wasn’t sure a single one of them had changed anything. That’s not a bar that cartoonists generally set for themselves, but in the case of my story arc about racist Palm Beach pass cards, the strip did have an impact. Exposure of the apartheid-like ordinance proved so embarrassing to Florida that the state legislature passed a law banning it. It was called the “Doonesbury Bill,” and the governor sent me the signing pen. Still, that’s the exception. Most of the time, expecting satire to make a difference is purely aspirational.

For the full article visit:

https://www.washingtonpost.com/arts-entertainment/2020/11/27/doonesbury-garry-trudeau-anniversary/

And, for those of you who are interested in watching the Millicent Fenwick talk held at the Hoboken Historical Museum on October 18, 2020, here is the YouTube link:

Save the Date – NJ Women Make History – October 18, 2020

The Hoboken Museum is hosting the New Jersey Women Make History Lecture Series this fall featuring New Jersey women who have left their mark on history.

On Sunday, October 18, at 4 PM, I’ll be speaking about Millicent Fenwick’s incredible life and the impact her legislation still has today nearly half a century later. This event will be held in person at the Hoboken Museum and live-streamed. Hope to see you there.

Hoboken Museum / 1301 Hudson Street / Hoboken, NJ

For more information, please visit: http://www.hobokenmuseum.org

Happy Easter

Thanks to my cousin, Mara, for sending me this FaceBook post from M Therese Crowley, a Fox News Radio Anchor. Even COVID-19 didn’t keep someone away from decorating Millicent Fenwick for Easter.

Screenshot 2020-04-12 at 1.21.52 PM

 

 

110

110Today, February 25, 2020, would have been Millicent Fenwick’s 110th birthday. I’ve been thinking about her a lot lately not only because it is an election year which means her name appears in the news more often than usual, especially in New Jersey, but because the Republican Party has changed so much since she was elected. While I believe she would still be a Republican today, I also think she would vocalize her opinion when she disagreed with the party. What surprises me most is that Millicent Fenwick: Her Way was published more than 15 years ago and I am still getting emails from readers, most of whom have their own Fenwick stories to share. I treasure them all. For those of you in New Jersey, it looks like I may have a couple books talks in the fall. Stay tuned here for more information.

A Grandson’s Memory

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Sam Reckford, Millicent Fenwick’s grandson, accepts her induction into the New Jersey Hall of Fame from former NJ Gov. Christine Todd Whitman and CNN anchor Susan Hendricks. 

Sam Reckford, Millicent Fenwick’s grandson, recently accepted her induction into the New Jersey Hall of Fame on May 6, 2018. Yesterday his affectionate memories of his grandmother were published on north jersey.com. His article appears below.

Remembering my grandmother, Rep. Millicent Fenwick

Last week I accepted, on behalf of my grandmother, Millicent Fenwick, her induction into the New Jersey Hall of Fame.

Grandma was a character. One might say that you couldn’t have made her up, but Garry Trudeau came remarkably close in his creation of Lacey Davenport.

Her style and personality were forged from an odd set of circumstances that would be impossible to replicate. She was born into great privilege, but had her mother ripped away from her when she was just four years old, with the sinking of the Lusitania.

She debuted before the King of Spain, but loathed society events.

She disobeyed her parents’ wishes by marrying a dashing aviator, but was soon abandoned by him, and left with two small children and few resources.

She struggled to get a job because she never finished high school, and was even turned away from selling stockings at Bonwit Teller. Of course, what the hiring officer at Bonwit’s didn’t appreciate was that Grandma was the living embodiment of the old maxim, “Don’t let school get in the way of your education.”

When she was withdrawn from boarding school at 16 to live in Madrid – where her father was posted as U.S. ambassador – she gained the opportunity to travel throughout Europe and North Africa, read extensively and learn many languages.

Then fate – made possible by her social position – placed her at a dinner party next to Condé Nast at a time when he needed a junior editor at Vogue.

As a child, I largely knew my grandmother as the author of Vogue’s Book of Etiquette. She knew exactly how people ought to behave in all circumstances, and she dutifully recorded it, but made it plain that etiquette was principally about making people feel comfortable, not Victorian stuffiness.

The most immutable rule of all was how to treat people that are in a subservient position; it is far more important to treat them with respect than it is to act in a certain way in front of one’s peers and social superiors. That is how Grandma came to be loved by her staff and the shopkeepers in Bernardsville, yet not so much by the chairmen of powerful House committees and Cabinet secretaries, not to mention autocrats around the world.

Despite her aristocratic bearing, Grandma had a rapport with working people and those that society had neglected because she truly cared about them and their problems, and they recognized it.

In my office, I have a tapestry embroidered by six Ukrainian women jailed in a gulag in Moldavia, given to her in appreciation of her defense of human rights in the USSR. I don’t know how these unfortunate women found out about her struggle for what would become the Helsinki Accords in that pre-Internet age, but it is an inspiration to me every day to see this testament to what one caring and determined person can accomplish.

It was an honor to stand in for her and thank the people of New Jersey for this official recognition of her life of public service.

We can all aspire to follow her good example.

Sam Reckford is a resident of Millburn.

 

NJ Hall of Fame Ceremony

636612453892803599-BJPA8915Welcome to all the new subscribers to Six Degrees of Millicent! Since I haven’t posted anything since last month, I’m guessing the traffic is related to the recent New Jersey Hall of Fame Induction over the weekend. It was a star-studded event with Whoopi Goldberg as Emcee and Bruce Springsteen making a surprise appearance, and performance, with inductee Stevie Van Zandt. I did not attend the event, but read all about it:

Springsteen’s Surprise Asbury Park Appearance / New Jersey Monthly

https://njmonthly.com/articles/just-for-the-web/springsteens-surprise-asbury-park-appearance/